News and Articles

22

Feb

2015

Change in Start Time: We'll Begin at 1:00PM LEARN HOW TO BUTCHER A CHICKEN

Demonstration and Hands On Practice in Butchering a Chicken.

Author: Annie M

Join us February 22nd (4th Sunday meeting) at 1:00PM for a hands on workshop.  Cara Hagar will demo how to butcher a chicken.  Anyone who wants to (and brings a chicken to butcher) will have a chance for hands on participation. The workshop will be held at the home of Pat and Andrea Johns. If you bring birds to butcher please withhold food for 24 hrs prior to butchering. It's important for the crop to empty prior to butchering. Do not withhold water. 


Comments (7) Number of views (18769) Article rating: 4.4

25

Nov

2014

Charcoal Poultry Feed

Stack those functions.

Author: Phil

Apparently, slipping charcoal to your chickens is a centuries old practice for happy chickens and better nutrient retention in the manure.

Comments (1) Number of views (14317) Article rating: 5.0

5

Jun

2014

Raising Poultry for Profit and Pleasure

Workshop with Jim Adkins, founder of the Sustainable Poultry Network

WORKSHOP:  

Raising Poultry for 

Profit & Pleasure 

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

 

 

Instructor:  Jim Adkins, founder of the Sustainable Poultry Network, has a passion for poultry and people that shows in his business.  He is an internationally renowned poultry judge who has traveled the world since he created the International Center for Poultry in 1992! 

 

Jim started his poultry interest in 4-H in the southwestern portion of Washington State. Since that time, Jim has raised over fifty breeds and varieties of standard bred poultry including chickens, ducks, geese & turkeys. 

 

 

Workshop participants learn how to; 

  *Identify true heritage poultry

  *Optimize your facility, feed, and forage

  *Select heritage poultry for production

  *Standard poultry best breeding practices

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15

Mar

2014

Honey Locust

Uses: nitrogen fixer, wild and domestic animal fodder. Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.

Author: Annie M

Take a look at this tree.  It's uses include nitrogen fixation, wild and domestic animal fodder, rot resistant timber good for fence posts and furniture.  The spring flowers attract all pollinators.  Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.  

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19

Feb

2014

Good Neighbor Farms

Patrick and Andrea Johns plan for a permaculture life

Author: Annie M

We live on 1.5 acres in the Spokane Valley.  We have lived here 35 years.  For the most part we have kept the place free of toxic chemicals.  We have three 60 year old apple trees, two 60 year old sweet cherry trees, and a lovely, old plum tree.  The fruit on that tree is like honey, no bitterness under the skin.  There is also a 25 year old Black Walnut that produces a lot of nuts.  We just have to figure out how to liberate the nut meats from the outer hull.  Our rhubarb, raspberries and horseradish are well established.  All the other fruit bearing trees are 10 years old and younger.  

Comments (6) Number of views (20872) Article rating: 5.0

8

Feb

2014

Tilia Cordata (Linden species)

Large tree with edible leaves, flowers, nutlets. Good all around tree for people and livestock

Author: Annie M
Linden is a fast growing tree reaching 100 ft when full grown. Leaves are good additional green in salads. Flowers make a delicious tea. Nutlets have been compared to chocolate. Tilia Cordata (Little Leaf Linden) hardy to zone 4. This tree is a very good bee attractant. Linden honey is of high value.
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30

Jan

2014

CHICKENS: feed value of alternative grains

Protein, fat and amino acid values of various, common grains

Author: Annie M

This article from the University of Kentucky compares feed values and limitations of various grains.

GRAINS USED IN POULTRY DIETS

Grains are the main ingredient used in poultry diets to supply energy. A variety of different grains have been used, based primarily on the location. Corn is more commonly used most of the United States while wheat and barley are more common in Canada and parts of Europe. Sorghum is often used in the southern states as well as Africa. 

Comments (0) Number of views (15598) Article rating: 5.0

30

Jan

2014

ALTERNATIVE ANIMAL FEED

See the attached link re: poplar and willow used as fodder

Author: Annie M
If you are interested in producing animal feed on your farm consider planting poplar and willow like they do in New Zealand. Linden and mulberry leaves also work well as high protein animal fodder. All these tree varieties grow well in the Inland Northwest.
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8

Apr

2013

Feeding the flock from the Homestead's own resources

Author: Annie M
If you have read “Making Your Own Poultry Feeds”, a discussion of making my own feed mixes to replace commercial feeds for my flocks, you will remember my two criteria for superior poultry food: that it be live and raw . For the following discussion, let’s add a third: and produced from the homestead’s own resources.
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