News and Articles

2

Mar

2016

Living Fences

See this website for good information about growing a living fence using willows.

Author: Annie M
http://www.westwaleswillows.co.uk/fedgeplanting.html
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12

Jan

2016

Chestnut Cultivation

Increase nutrition in your food forest using chestnut trees.

Author: Annie M

Take look at this website for detailed info re: cultivation of chestnut trees.  The article includes site selection, planting instructions for direct seeding or starting seedlings in pots, maintenance of your orchard, deer control strategies, pest and pathogen info, fertilization and watering requirements.  They also list some other websites for further information. 

Here's a You Tube video. It covers food value, timber value, feed value for livestock, medicinal uses.

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28

Sep

2015

Help Us 2Produce a Production of Produce and more!

Author: merlinuhl
Comments (0) Number of views (8463) Article rating: No rating

11

May

2015

There's Still Time to Register for the Permaculture Design Course May 23 to June 7 near Spokane

It's one of the most affordable PDCs in the U.S.

Comments (0) Number of views (12965) Article rating: No rating

23

Nov

2014

2015 Inland Northwest Permaculture Design Course?

A message from Michael "Skeeter" Pilarski seeking advice from permaculture-inclined folks in Spokane County, Stevens County and surrounding counties.

Comments (0) Number of views (15080) Article rating: No rating

25

May

2014

Spokane Lease Your Lawn Cooperative Farm

Permie designers, job seekers and urban property owners needed!

Author: merlinuhl

Would you like to grow the citys food and do your part to solve the climate, economic, and environmental problems? See what kind of oppertunities Spokane LYL Coop Farm has for you! 

http://spokanelylcoopfarm.wordpress.com/

Comments (3) Number of views (15618) Article rating: 4.0

15

Mar

2014

Honey Locust

Uses: nitrogen fixer, wild and domestic animal fodder. Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.

Author: Annie M

Take a look at this tree.  It's uses include nitrogen fixation, wild and domestic animal fodder, rot resistant timber good for fence posts and furniture.  The spring flowers attract all pollinators.  Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.  

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19

Feb

2014

Good Neighbor Farms

Patrick and Andrea Johns plan for a permaculture life

Author: Annie M

We live on 1.5 acres in the Spokane Valley.  We have lived here 35 years.  For the most part we have kept the place free of toxic chemicals.  We have three 60 year old apple trees, two 60 year old sweet cherry trees, and a lovely, old plum tree.  The fruit on that tree is like honey, no bitterness under the skin.  There is also a 25 year old Black Walnut that produces a lot of nuts.  We just have to figure out how to liberate the nut meats from the outer hull.  Our rhubarb, raspberries and horseradish are well established.  All the other fruit bearing trees are 10 years old and younger.  

Comments (6) Number of views (19329) Article rating: 5.0

18

Dec

2013

Food Forest Design and Care for Cities and Suburbs

with Toby Hemenway

Food forests, or edible forest gardens, are life-filled places that not only provide food for people, but habitat for wildlife, carbon sequestering, biodiversity, natural soil building, beauty and tranquility, and a host of other benefits. This workshop covers the basics of designing, planting, and maintaining a many-layered woodland garden of fruit and nut trees, perennial and annual vegetables, and flowers. In this class Toby gives you both the theory behind food forests and a wealth of practical information, including which plants to use, where to start, and what to expect as your food forest grows.
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24

Oct

2013

Common Camas

Edible native bulb, resembling onion, sweet in flavor. It is obtainable at Plants of the Wild in Tekoa, WA

Author: Annie M
Camas root was used extensively by indigenous tribes as a steady source of starch in their diets. Info found on USDA Plant Database.
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