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Plant and Tree Profiles

This resource section contain member provided profiles of trees and plants that work well in our area.

2

Mar

2016

Living Fences

See this website for good information about growing a living fence using willows.

Author: Annie M
http://www.westwaleswillows.co.uk/fedgeplanting.html
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15

Mar

2014

Honey Locust

Uses: nitrogen fixer, wild and domestic animal fodder. Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.

Author: Annie M

Take a look at this tree.  It's uses include nitrogen fixation, wild and domestic animal fodder, rot resistant timber good for fence posts and furniture.  The spring flowers attract all pollinators.  Coppicing increases amount of wood available for use.  

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30

Jan

2014

CHICKENS: feed value of alternative grains

Protein, fat and amino acid values of various, common grains

Author: Annie M

This article from the University of Kentucky compares feed values and limitations of various grains.

GRAINS USED IN POULTRY DIETS

Grains are the main ingredient used in poultry diets to supply energy. A variety of different grains have been used, based primarily on the location. Corn is more commonly used most of the United States while wheat and barley are more common in Canada and parts of Europe. Sorghum is often used in the southern states as well as Africa. 

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30

Jan

2014

ALTERNATIVE ANIMAL FEED

See the attached link re: poplar and willow used as fodder

Author: Annie M
If you are interested in producing animal feed on your farm consider planting poplar and willow like they do in New Zealand. Linden and mulberry leaves also work well as high protein animal fodder. All these tree varieties grow well in the Inland Northwest.
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24

Oct

2013

Common Camas

Edible native bulb, resembling onion, sweet in flavor. It is obtainable at Plants of the Wild in Tekoa, WA

Author: Annie M
Camas root was used extensively by indigenous tribes as a steady source of starch in their diets. Info found on USDA Plant Database.
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